Nutrient intake estimates from three day diet recall by Grade V pupils in selected schools in Davao City following vegetables gardening and cooking interventions / Neil Marvin E. Carilhay; Pedro A. Alviola, adviser

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextPublication details: 2018Description: 107 leavesSubject(s): Abstract: The lack of essential nutrients has been one of the prevailing causes of nutrient deficiencies in school children. A diet that consists of vegetables and other food items that are rich in nutrients and a program that enables children to cultivate their food would strategically change their consumption towards a healthier diet. Thus, the objective of this study was to improve the indigenous vegetables consumption of grade V pupils. The intervention included vegetable gardening and a cooking demonstration that were administered in three treatment elementary schools in Davao City. To measure the effect of the intervention, the Difference-in-differences (DID) method was used in conjunction with the pre and post survey that included information pertaining to 3-day diet recall of Grade V pupils. The results showed an overall increase in intakes of micronutrients, minerals and vitamins. Also, statistically significant DID estimates were found in enrgy, protein, and carbohydrates for macronutrients. For minerals and vitamins, the following had statistically significant DID values: P, Mg, K, Zn, Vitamin C, Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, vitamin B6, and Vitamin E. the increased nutrients intake is attributable to the increased consumption of indigenous vegetables such as squash, Malabar nightshade, water spinach, tomato, and eggplant that the children cultivated and cooked. However, some indigenous vegetables were already a staple to some areas. The intervention generally improved the consumption of indigenous vegetables by school age children. Therefore, program interventions involving gardening and cooking demonstrations can enable children achieve healthier and more balanced diets.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Star ratings
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Thesis University Library Non-Circulation LG 993.5 2018 A3 C37 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 3UPML00037886

Thesis (BS Agribusiness Economics) -- University of the Philippines Mindanao, May 2018

The lack of essential nutrients has been one of the prevailing causes of nutrient deficiencies in school children. A diet that consists of vegetables and other food items that are rich in nutrients and a program that enables children to cultivate their food would strategically change their consumption towards a healthier diet. Thus, the objective of this study was to improve the indigenous vegetables consumption of grade V pupils. The intervention included vegetable gardening and a cooking demonstration that were administered in three treatment elementary schools in Davao City. To measure the effect of the intervention, the Difference-in-differences (DID) method was used in conjunction with the pre and post survey that included information pertaining to 3-day diet recall of Grade V pupils. The results showed an overall increase in intakes of micronutrients, minerals and vitamins. Also, statistically significant DID estimates were found in enrgy, protein, and carbohydrates for macronutrients. For minerals and vitamins, the following had statistically significant DID values: P, Mg, K, Zn, Vitamin C, Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, vitamin B6, and Vitamin E. the increased nutrients intake is attributable to the increased consumption of indigenous vegetables such as squash, Malabar nightshade, water spinach, tomato, and eggplant that the children cultivated and cooked. However, some indigenous vegetables were already a staple to some areas. The intervention generally improved the consumption of indigenous vegetables by school age children. Therefore, program interventions involving gardening and cooking demonstrations can enable children achieve healthier and more balanced diets.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
 
University of the Philippines Mindanao
The University Library, UP Mindanao, Mintal, Tugbok District, Davao City, Philippines
Email: library.upmindanao@up.edu.ph
Contact: (082)295-7025
Copyright @ 2022 | All Rights Reserved